movq www.uninformativ.de
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Recent twts from movq

In-reply-to > Coooooool. So it finally happened. Microsoft decided to block all my mails. Congrutalations. I can now no longer respond to someone with whom I’ve already had a conversation going on.

Microsoft replied and said: “Not qualified for mitigation.” No reason given.

Fuck ’em.


#xwat3fa
In-reply-to > Coooooool. So it finally happened. Microsoft decided to block all my mails. Congrutalations. I can now no longer respond to someone with whom I’ve already had a conversation going on.

@fastidious Yep, deep on that page is a link to a support form. I filed a request. Let’s see what happens.


#zykaupq

Coooooool. So it finally happened. Microsoft decided to block all my mails. Congrutalations. I can now no longer respond to someone with whom I’ve already had a conversation going on.


#alwe2fq
In-reply-to > Hey everyone, I'm experimenting with hosting pixel drawing games again, so if you have a minute and are on a computer, you can visit the new site at: https://k9-place.glitch.me and claim some pixels of your own on this new canvas! 😄

I opened it in two browsers at the same time (because it looked like WebKit didn’t quite work) and made a mess. 🤣


#qo5idbq
In-reply-to > Aaaaaaaaand now one of the pickups on my bass went silent. What a lovely day.

@lyse You’re joking, but I have no idea about the electronics in that thing. It should be purely passive and purely analogue (there’s no power), but who knows, maybe it’s connected to some cloud service. Like everything else these days.

(Eventually, if it keeps acting up, I’ll open it and have a look. But not yet.)


#n7mcd2a
In-reply-to > Today I called it a day earlier and enjoyed the 5°C hot sunshine. You will probably notice by now with ease, I went up my backyard mountain again and enjoyed the sunset. The scenery was dimmed by three women who loadly yelled all the time, quite annoying. I had to take the sneaky backpath detour, because the tree service had closed off the main one due to felling activities of dead and sick ashes. Some sections were one thick sheet of slippery ice. But I made it safely. The flag disintegrates even further. The more it is ripped apart, the higher the windage is, resulting in a nice death spiral. But this silly, flapping fabric doesn't affect the moods over here as you can see by the two snowmen somebody had built. https://lyse.isobeef.org/waldspaziergang-2022-01-24/

@lyse Oh man, I envy you for that scenery. 😅 Great shots. I miss the sun.


#li33ena
In-reply-to > Aaaaaaaaand now one of the pickups on my bass went silent. What a lovely day.

@fastidious I intentionally bought cheap instruments, because they were experiments. I really didn’t know what to expect. I also couldn’t find a store nearby that sells them, so I just had to place a mail order and hope for the best. 😅 So, actually, I’m not in a position to complain. I knew what I was getting into. 🥴

But yeah, next time I’ll pay a lot more money.


#v3sczga
In-reply-to > KDE-Powering Qt's New Framework Lets Developers Bring Ads Into Their Apps "Qt, the framework that powers the KDE desktop, is announcing support for ads in client-side applications," reports Neowin:

@prologic That’s right. But it’s an issue with Qt, not with KDE. It’s not that KDE decided to show ads on their desktop now, right? Actually, I don’t think anything is going to happen to KDE at all. But sooner or later, more and more (independent) Qt programs could make use of this new ad thingy, and thus Qt (and, to some degree, KDE with it) could become … well, a shitshow.


#bwtfd5q
In-reply-to > Finished my migration to pass today. It’s been quite some time since I’ve been excited about new software. 😁 The list of pass clients is pretty impressive. I’ve also finally made peace with GPG Agent and I actually like it now. 🤯

@lyse Go for it! There’s even a Firefox plugin. 🤯


#hz3w6pa
In-reply-to > Finished my migration to pass today. It’s been quite some time since I’ve been excited about new software. 😁 The list of pass clients is pretty impressive. I’ve also finally made peace with GPG Agent and I actually like it now. 🤯

@benk Lol, you’re right, of course. %) “New” as in “I just started using it”. :D I should have used it right from the start, but I didn’t know about it back in 2012 – so I wrote my own thing back then (pretty much at the same time when pass started) and never looked for alternatives again. :/


#llnfvlq
In-reply-to > Am I the only one seeing this? 🤔 https://github.com/vim/vim/issues/9586

@lyse I usually do ^Z when a) I quickly want to read some previous output from the same terminal or b) when there’s special “context” that I want to preserve. Like, the current directory, maybe a Python virtualenv is active, maybe I set some env vars. Stuff like that. (Sometimes, the same can be achieved by launching a terminal through Vim instead of the global hotkey daemon.)

Interesting, though. In the examples you listed, I usually do ^S / ^Q. Never really though about why I do that instead of ^Z. But now I’m reading that ^S (SIGSTOP) cannot be caught by processes. I guess that’s an advantage here, because the process really is forced to stop and cannot misbehave by doing $whatever in its signal handler. 😁


#xkgmviq

Finished my migration to pass today. It’s been quite some time since I’ve been excited about new software. 😁 The list of pass clients is pretty impressive. I’ve also finally made peace with GPG Agent and I actually like it now. 🤯


#4rjll3a
In-reply-to > Am I the only one seeing this? 🤔 https://github.com/vim/vim/issues/9586

Aaaaaand it’s fixed, weeeeeeeeee 🥳 (I’m still baffled that this hit so few people. Has ^Z grown out of fashion? I would have expected there to be a ton of Vim users on Arch with tiling window managers, who use ^Z all the time …)


#7v5tmkq
In-reply-to > The EU Approves Sweeping Draft Regulations On Social Media Giants "The European Union took a significant step Thursday toward passing legislation that could transform the way major technology companies operate," reports the Washington Post, "requiring them to police content on their platforms more aggressively and introducing new restrictions on advertising, among other provisions...."

@prologic Not much. First time I heard about it, to be honest. 🙈 Scrolling through the articles on netzpolitik.org, it could be a good thing? But it’s a large “package”, there could be nasty stuff hidden. It’s still a work-in-progress, there’s no final version yet. 🤷


#ja7rq3a
In-reply-to > (#bwsglma) @movq What about something like what Antenna does?, supplying a URL you can call to push your feed Gemini - About Antenna

@prologic Oh, hold on, we’re talking about two different things here. 😅

Yes, I agree: There doesn’t need to be a mechanism for actively sending a message from user A to user B when user A mentions user B.

What I meant, though, was indeed discovery of new feeds. Or rather: New followers. At the moment, you can only find out about new followers by inspecting their HTTP user agents – and that only works via HTTP. So, for the purpose of notifying feed authors about new followers, I was proposing a pingback-like mechanism. (And I think this is also what the original GitHub issue from 2016 was talking about.)


#ruzkugq
In-reply-to > (#bwsglma) @movq What about something like what Antenna does?, supplying a URL you can call to push your feed Gemini - About Antenna

@prologic Hmm. Some thoughts.

WebMentions are probably the best solution in a world with “HTTP + server-side code”. (You need something to process the POST request.)

The … well, let’s call it “beauty” … of the original twtxt spec was that sending special HTTP user agents does not require server-side code. You can just grep your logs. This is probably not relevant for Yarn, but it is for me – I run a plain httpd, no CGI, no PHP, no nothing. That thing serves static HTML and that’s it. And I want to keep it that way, because it saves me a lot of trouble.

So that’s one aspect.

Another aspect is Gemini and Gopher: While they do support user input, they don’t support multiple fields. I.e., source and target as it is specified by WebMentions won’t work. So you have to come up with your own format anyway.

So, yeah, what’s left? How could it be done? Maybe something like this:

  • We need a format to specify feed URL and nick name. I’d simply go with this: ${source.nick} ${source.url}, e.g. movq https://www.uninformativ.de/twtxt.txt
  • HTTP: A GET request with one percent-encoded parameter, e.g.: https://www.uninformativ.de/twtxt.txt?follow=movq%20https%3A%2F%2Fwww.uninformativ.de%2Ftwtxt.txt
  • Gemini: A request with a percent-encoded parameter, e.g.: gemini://www.uninformativ.de/twtxt.txt?movq%20https%3A%2F%2Fwww.uninformativ.de%2Ftwtxt.txt
  • Gopher: A “search request” (menu type 7), no need for percent encoding here, e.g.: /twtxt.txt<literal_tab>movq https://www.uninformativ.de/twtxt.txt

If you run server-side code, then it can interpret this additional payload. If you, like me, run nothing but static httpd, then the requests will usually be served as if there was no parameter – but the full query will usually show up in log files.

So basically, this would be like moving the info from the HTTP user agent to some other place where it’s supported for all protocols.

Now, we could send this parameter for every request, but I’m not sure if that’s a good idea. For one, it creates noise. Also, what if a server is pedantic and takes the request literally, i.e. it searches for a file called twtxt.txt?follow=movq%20https:%2F%2Fwww.uninformativ.de%2Ftwtxt.txt? Or maybe Gopher servers refuse to serve the twtxt.txt file if there’s a search parameter. So I guess it’s better to only do these “pingback requests” every once in a while.

Strictly speaking, we could ignore HTTP entirely and just keep using the user agent here. We would then only be using this new format for Gopher and Gemini. I’m not sure, though, if it’s a good idea to use such different methods depending on the protocol. On the other hand, we should care about backwards compatibility.


#ansuy4a
In-reply-to > So, @prologic, having a slash on the nick breaks mentions. Is there a consensus on which characters are allowed on nicks, or just about anything goes? Evidently I am not going to be exchanging that many twts (if anything at all) with someone with a slash on their nick, but it would be nice to either set some "standard", or fix mentions (again?!) to accommodate.

@prologic Yeah, probably. 🤔 Technically, anything that doesn’t end in a space or a parenthesis (because that would break the user agent string) would work in plain old twtxt … At the end of the day, it’s not specified. I gravitate towards “letters and digits”, yeah.


#2mf4kma
In-reply-to > This (sorry it is a Twitter link) is such a huge problem! It refers to train burglaries in Los Angeles, as trains full of cargo slow down, or stop, at a certain place. Thieves use the opportunity to break open containers, and steal their contents.

@fastidious That video on Twitter created the impression that this is happening in “rural“ areas, where nobody is around. But I just saw this on a german news outlet:

Here, it looks like it’s right in the middle of the city. 🤯


#m3g4fmq
In-reply-to > So I was writing a little "wordle"-like game in Rust, when suddenly … oops … there’s no rand() … https://www.uninformativ.de/git/rustle/file/src/main%2Ers%2Ehtml#l61 😬

I understand that random numbers are much harder than one might think, so they’re probably reluctant to add something to the standard library until it’s “good”. So, for now, we have this:

https://crates.io/crates/rand/

The legend goes that there once was a rand() in the standard library:

https://stackoverflow.com/a/29334943

I really wonder how this strategy will play out for the Rust community. How will those external libraries ever be integrated into the standard library? This is going to be a long and painful process, which will involve breaking and rewriting lots and lots of Rust programs. Well, not necessarily breaking, because dependencies are pinned by default, but it’s exactly that pinning which makes it easy for software to rot (never gets updated, because “it works 🤷”).

Then again, that guy on StackOverflow makes a good point about the sequence of HTTP libraries in Python. 🤔 Python can only grow and, maybe, there’ll be a “clear cut” some day – which will be just as painful.

It all has pros and cons.


#imrv3tq
In-reply-to > (#bwsglma) @benk Ah, look at that. Lots of twtxt users in Gemini space. 🤯 Does that mean I should extend my client? It doesn’t speak gemini:// at the moment. 😢

@fastidious I admit, I forgot about WinSCP. 😅

Still, it’s a third-party tool and we’d prefer to use built-in stuff. Any third-party tool means we have to keep track of updates/patches/security issues and we have to add more documentation (where is that tool from, how do you install it, how do you configure it, …).

Maybe, with WSL, we could have built something based on SSH. I have zero experience with that, though. The PowerShell thingy was much quicker. Might be worth to check this out later, though.


#w6rn2na
In-reply-to > @prologic Fun fact: I set up new FTP stuff at work today. It was the easiest way to transfer files from a Windows machine to a Linux box.

@prologic I am indeed serious. 😅

I wanted to spent as little time as possible with this Windows machine. Also, I didn’t want to introduce any new maintainence burdens. Using any third-party software would have caused the latter. 😢

PowerShell/Windows has a built-in FTP client. Basically this:

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1867385/upload-files-with-ftp-using-powershell/1868367#1868367k

(I tried to use ftp.exe first, but that thing doesn’t support passive FTP, which we need.)

The FTP server already existed anyway. (You don’t want to know why.)

Missing transport encryption aside (this runs in our internal network only, so it’s okay-ish to accept), I don’t think this is the worst solution, to be honest.


#dv567vq

(#yf6xs4q) The one who asked was me. 🥴 It works fine in gemini clients like lagrange, but gnutls and openssl both complain about abnormally terminated connections. Will have to investigate.


#l7kohtq
In-reply-to > (#bwsglma) @benk Ah, look at that. Lots of twtxt users in Gemini space. 🤯 Does that mean I should extend my client? It doesn’t speak gemini:// at the moment. 😢

@prologic Fun fact: I set up new FTP stuff at work today. It was the easiest way to transfer files from a Windows machine to a Linux box.


#mju3mga
In-reply-to > Had to deal with lots of Microsoft stuff today at work. Am now questioning my life choices. Maybe I should start living in a buddhist monastery or something. 🤔

@eaplmx Yeah, that’s how I remember it. What I think to remember rather vividly was being stumped by that new “registry” thingy. “Why are they trying to take our good old INI files away? 😢” But you’re totally right, it was a really long time ago, so it’s quite possible that I’m mis-remembering. 😅 (Or maybe I’m projecting my today’s views/feelings on those old things …)


#h4ymgla
In-reply-to > Had to deal with lots of Microsoft stuff today at work. Am now questioning my life choices. Maybe I should start living in a buddhist monastery or something. 🤔

@fastidious Azure was actually one of those things I came in contact with today. 🙈 🙊

@markwylde To be fair, Windows 95 thru XP only feel nice today. When I switched from Windows 3.1 to 95, it felt horribly bloated. 🤣 But hey, it was pretty good at playing videos.


#w65kztq
In-reply-to > looking into hosting my own twtxt.txt file now. leaning towards using jenny client. loving the relative simplicity of twtxt.

@xavavu FWIW, I updated the blog post about jenny. It was a bit outdated.

(Eventually, I won’t update that blog post anymore. The README files are the primary source of truth. It’s just that this blog post is still almost at the top on my page, so …)


#ghna7xa